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Humanities new resources: Archaeology


           New Archaeology Library resources

                       See below for new library collections.

New Archaeology databases

We have recently subscribed to these new online databases. Access them via the A to Z database list.

Hover over the i symbol to find out more about each collection.

Adam Matthew Collection

 

 

The Adam Matthew Research Collection provides access to over 80 primary source collections that support the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.  

The University of Exeter is the only European university with access to the entire Adam Matthew collection.

View the entire collection here.

To aid discovery, the databases have been sorted into various categories. View by content type, subject, geographic area, theme or time period.

Recent journal archive acquisitions

These journal collections have recently been purchased and can be accessed via Library Search:

  • Antiquaries Journal (2006 onwards) - Archive now spans from 1921-Sep 2018
    The Antiquaries Journal aims to reflect the multi-disciplinary nature of the study of material culture, publishing a balanced mix of papers from all periods, from prehistory to the recent past. The journal seeks papers that address research questions from a variety of perspectives, combining, for example, historical, art historical, architectural, linguistic, archaeological and scientific data. It will be essential reading for archaeologists, architectural and art historians and material culture specialists, as well as those involved in conservation in its broadest application.

     
  • Archaeologia - Archive now spans from 1770-1990. (Called The Antiquaries Journal since 1921) See above
     
  • Mnemosyne Supplements (No.s.1 -203)
    (MNS) has existed as a book series for about 80 years, providing a forum for the publication of over 400 scholarly works on all aspects of the Ancient World, including inscriptions, papyri, language, the history of material culture and mentality, the history of peoples and institutions, but also latterly the classical tradition, for example, neo-Latin literature and the history of Classical scholarship. 

 

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