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Using Library electronic resources: Where do I start?

A brief introduction to the Library's electronic resources

 

There are two Library Research tools that will help you find print and electronic primary and secondary materials:

Library Search 

 A-Z Databases

Logging in to resources

UoE registered staff and students should always login when prompted with your University username and password. 

 

You do not need the alternative login with separate library card number and PIN - that is used by users external to the University.

A small number of databases require a special username and password.  These details are available via the username and passwords page for registered users.

Library Search

A- Z Databases

Library Search is often a good starting point for introductory material, but if you want to research the global literature on a topic, and go beyond quick full text results, then you should follow up with a database search. You can tailor your search more precisely using all the sophisticated functionality available on the research databases.  

To find databases, use the A-Z list. See the next tab for help with finding the best databases for your topic.

Each entry in the A-Z database list has an information icon. Hover over that symbol for information about the content that is available in the database and an idea of why it might be useful for research purposes. Shown below is the information for Project Muse, which is a valuable humanities research database.

You can scroll through the A-Z and choose a database if you know exactly what you are looking for.

Alternatively, you can select your subject from the drop down subject menu to see a subset of resources in that category.

The subject listings will highlight the 'core resources'; these are key databases that are likely to be of interest to anyone studying and researching in that area.

 

Research material can be drawn from a wide range of different types of information. You may wish to use specialist sources such as news items, statistical data, archival and audiovisual materials.

Find out more by visiting the Searching for specific types of information libguide

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